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Posts Tagged ‘webinar’

Fall Science Workshop Preview Webinar – Oct 2, 2012 3:30 PM

September 27th, 2012 No comments

Prepare for the NGSS

Join us for a taste of the Fall Regional Workshops for science scheduled all over the state. We’ll spend time looking at the Practices and explore how an MLTI application supports them. Of course, there will be ample opportunity for give and take discussion in preparation for the Next Generation of Science Standards and how technology and the 8 Practices of Science and Engineering can be aligned.

Sign up for Webinar here and and you will be directed to an online registration form. Please type your email address carefully as all information will be sent to that address. After registering you will receive a confirmation email with a log in link – please use that link to log into the webinar prior to the start time.

May 17 Webinar – From Micro to Macro: 21st Century Economics Education

May 14th, 2012 No comments

Economics is a subject that is generally given the lightest touch as part of a social studies curriculum, and yet an understanding of economic concepts can have some of the longest standing results in student’s lives beyond school. By incorporating a broader study of economics into curriculum beyond a social studies classroom, students will be able to create and stick to a personal budget, follow and predict fluctuations in stock and land prices, develop business plans that are sustainable and understand how economic practices influence international development. Economics is an important part of every student’s education, and every teacher can play a part in developing economic understanding.

This webinar will look at tools on the MLTI image and online that can support the teaching of economics. From personal finance to global economic indicators, there are many ways in which digital tools can build an understanding of concepts such as supply and demand, input and output and economic development. While this is not intended to be a comprehensive view of an economics curriculum, it will point the way to developing an engaging method of incorporating the subject into schoolwide teaching and learning.

To join the webinar, click on the Webcasts tab above and follow the links to register.

Image by images_of_money on Flickr. Used under a CC BY 2.0 license.

April 5 Webinar: Hot Points – Current Events and Digital Tools

April 1st, 2012 No comments

Current events teaching has never been juicier. Up to the second information on events from all points of the four winds can be easily gathered, disseminated and pored over using digital tools. Videos from within the Occupy Wall Street camp, tweets from observers and players in the Arab Spring uprising and the ability to communicate with anyone at the center of a news story via iChat means that students now have a more immediate connection to events than most journalists had fifteen years ago. And with traditional news sources sometimes struggling to compete with the constant flow of information, our students have never been in a better position to show their flair as budding journalists.

This webinar demonstrated how students can access information and turn it into a news story – making sense of multiple sources, applying a clear vision and creating news stories of their own. We discussed some of the drawbacks to the mass of unfiltered information, and how we can help our students become objective reporters and informed opinion makers.

Here are the links I shared in the webinar:

Newsmap: a visual representation of the Google News aggregator

Google News: Try customising the page using the Preference sliders

Newsvine: user voted news stories – a good place to take the temperature of the news

Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages: over 900 front pages from the world’s newspapers, update daily.

MARVEL: ProQuest News
database is a fantastic resource for searching through 1400+ publications from around the world, with many publication’s articles going back at least a decade.

In addition, we looked at YouTube’s capabilities for up to the minute footage of events, and iTunes Store’s News and Politics Podcasts. Google Earth can provide background on the areas where events are taking place, and the World Data Analyst on MARVEL can help with statistics on each country.

Image by Giladlotan on Flickr. Used with a Creative Commons License CC BY-NC 2.0

September 7 – Maine Arts Assessment Initiative webinar

August 31st, 2011 No comments

The MLTI and Department of Education will be hosting 5 webinars throughout the 2011-2012 school year on the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative and how it impacts teaching and learning in our schools.  Please join Catherine Ring, Rob Westerberg and guests for the first webinar, a conversation around Why Arts Assessment? An Introduction to the Maine Arts Education Assessment Initiative on Wednesday, September 7th, from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM. Instructions for joining the webinar can be found below.

Subsequent webinars will be held November 2, December 7, January 4, and February 1.  Mark your calendars now!  Each webinar will be recorded and added to the MLTI Archives for future viewing. Attendees will be eligible for two contact hours for their participation in the live webinar, just follow the feedback link at the end of the webinar and you’ll be prompted for your contact information to receive your contact hour certificate.

The Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) has been designed to create an environment in Maine where assessment in Arts education is an integral part of the work all arts educators do to deepen student learning in the arts. MAAI includes professional development opportunities, regionally and statewide, to share and expand on arts educators knowledge and skills. Teachers will be invited to contribute tools, resources, and examples of quality assessments and supportive standards based curriculum documents for all to access.

Please follow these steps to connect to the webinar:

  1. Click on the link http://stateofmaine.adobeconnect.com/pk201008.
  2. Enter your name in the Guest box when prompted.
  3. In order to listen and speak during the meeting, you will need to be connected by telephone as well as the Internet. To help you connect by phone, a box will appear asking for your phone number so the Connect conference room can call you back. If you have a telephone with a direct-dial phone number, please accept this option, enter your phone number, and we will call you right back.
  4. If you have a telephone with no direct-line phone number (if your phone is only reached by a switchboard), please click on CANCEL when the call-back box appears, then dial-in to the meeting using this access combination:
    1. Dial-In: 1-866-910-4857
    2. Pass-Code: 140893
  5. To participate in the webinar, you will need:
    1. a computer with a broadband connection to the internet (Cable, DSL, or WiFi); Dial-Up will not work!
    2. Adobe Flash Player 10 installed on your computer; most computers already have the Flash Player installed – however, if yours does not, or if your Flash Player is in need of updating (version 6 or older), you can download the player for free from Adobe by clicking on this link; this is a safe and quick download.
    3. An open phone line; we recommend using a hands-free headset or speakerphone.

Illustrated instructions for logging in to the meeting can be downloaded here.

March 24 Webinar: Connecting Classrooms

March 23rd, 2011 13 comments

This webinar will focus on the connectivity of our classrooms: getting our students in touch with other students, educators and experts outside of our school buildings. There is tremendous learning to be gained from discussions and collaborative work with people outside of the immediate environs. Differing perspectives, language practice, sharing lifestyle and culture information can all lead to a rewarding experience for students.
I will be joined by my special guest Nadene Mathes, first grade teacher at Atwood Primary School. She will take us through a project her students worked on with students in Europe, helping us to understand the work that goes into connection projects and the benefits her students gained from taking part. The webinar will also look at places to get started on connection projects, some ideas for ongoing projects and tools that can be used to smooth the way.
The webinar will take place on Thursday, March 24, at 3.15 and again at 7.15. To register for the webinar, click on the ‘Webcasts’ tab above and follow directions.

Image by superkimbo on Flickr, used under Creative Commons License.

January 27 Webinar: Responding to Students of Diverse Cultures

January 21st, 2011 No comments

As schools across Maine welcome increasing populations of students from other countries, educators need to be prepared to respond to their cultural and linguistic differences. For many students who are newcomers to the U.S. and learning the English language, or whose home cultures vary from the majority of  their peers, challenges to learning can be unique and isolating. At the same time, we have a responsibility to ensure that students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds are making progress in meeting standards of the curriculum.

This webinar will introduce participants to the intricacies of teaching students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in general education classrooms. We will be joined in conversation by Maureen Fox and Tom Talarico, both teachers of English Language Learners in the Portland Public Schools. They will share their knowledge and expertise, drawing on personal experience, to provide a background and understanding of the issues facing English Language Learners in our classrooms. We will also look at how technology, specifically applications on the MLTI devices, can be used to support multilingual and multicultural learners.

The webinar presenters will be Jim Wells and Cynthia Curry.

Image from the Kentucky County Day School on Flickr, used with an Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic license.

First Principal’s Webinar confirms – Librarians and Principals a Powerful Team for Integrating Learning and Technology!

November 2nd, 2010 No comments

Maine Cybrarians - Strong Advocates for MLTI!

Just quick note to thank Teri Caouette, Pam Goucher, Eileen Broderick, and Nancy Grant for graciously serving as guests for our first MLTI Principals webinar of the 2010-2011 school year! We had a good turn out for the 4 PM session with 26 participants from all over the state and even from Arizona! While we had a great conversation about ways principals, school librarians, and technology leaders can collaborate to support best practices around integrating learning and technology the chat pod was perking along as participants shared their insights, ideas, resources, affirmations, questions, and advice! Here’s a small excerpt from the chat window as an example:

Peggy George: did any of you get to see this presentation by David Lankes called Focus on Connection management and not collection management-he made excellent points related to connecting with people and content and curriculum!

http://quartz.syr.edu/rdlankes/blog/?p=1044

To read the rest of the chat window, hear the conversation, see the powerpoint slides, and access the list of online resources head on over to:
http://stateofmaine.na4.acrobat.com/p56289213/

And just a reminder, We’ll be gathering more guests on the 4th Tuesday each month at 4:00 PM. We are in the process of planning out the MLTI principals’ webinar topics for the remainder of the year. If you have a topic or two that you think should be taken up just let me know! You can respond by commenting below, or email me at christoy.net@gmail.com. I hope principals make a point of gathering their leadership teams and/or staffs to join in on these conversations, Because as we know, when it comes to school improvement…It’s all about leadership!

Notes from the October 28th Webinar: Accessing the Past

November 1st, 2010 No comments

The digitizing of primary source material is becoming an important step forward in the teaching and learning of history. The ability of students to access and use high quality images of primary sources that once were confined to archives, museums, libraries and historical society’s shelves means that new learning and understanding of the past is feasible at an unprecedented level. In addition, the tools available to students to create their own digital copies of primary sources adds a dimension of ownership to the creation of history that can only be imagined at this point. However, as educators, we must ensure that this process and action is ongoing, rigorous and meaningful.

We should be encouraging our students to explore and add to current archives of material available to them. Some of the online collections that were examined in the webinar included the Maine State Archives Civil War Sesquicentennial Collection, the Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress Flickr Collection of historic images. These three collections give a varied picture of how primary source materials are being presented to the public, and really only hint at the kinds of material available. To deepen this examination, students could be directed to search YouTube for primary source video, such as news broadcasts and amateur footage of events, and the Internet Archive for audio recordings.

The creation of digital copies of primary source material using student laptops is surprisingly simple, with the addition of a scanner or a digital camera that can create high resolution images. Scanners that can create images of 800 pixels per inch are now very affordable for most department budgets, and can be used by many to create an impressive library of digital images of documents, photographic prints and other material on a page, such as maps, plans and newspaper articles.
On the MLTI laptops, the application Image Capture makes the process getting a scanner to work very easy. For most scanners, it is a straightforward ‘plug and play’, and the ability to work with the images pre-scan is taken care of right in the application. Adjusting resolution, size of the image created, naming and location the image will be placed on the machine is now a matter of a few clicks.

Scanning guidelines for archival material can be found on the Maine Memory Network site.

Once a digital copy has been created, it is important to name the material correctly. This can be for the purposes of retrieval if the copies are added to a database, for both the creator and another user. If standard naming conventions are followed, it will make it more useful when sharing the material for anyone to locate and understand the material. The Maine State Archives have provided a naming convention for files containing digital copies, and can be found here.

Using digital tools to create meaning and understanding from primary source materials can occur in many ways. Using Comic Life to ‘unpack’ an image is a great entry point for many students: the whole image of the material can be placed in the center of a page, and cutaway focus images of the detail can then be added to the page, with text bubbles providing commentary on the detail. iMovie can be used to generate a Ken Burns style documentary (the default setting for still images in iMovie is the Ken Burns effect). Using Google Earth to locate the source material’s origin or current archive, through adding placemarks to the map, is a powerful way to build relationships to the material through geography. Building online collections, through blogs and wikis, and also through Flickr sets, provides the opportunity for the wider world to comment on the material, thus leading to new perspectives and new understanding around documents that were perhaps previously only available to a few.

The connections to the past that can be created through students using primary source material are important for the future of history and historical learning. By creating and gaining access to primary source material that before the arrival of the digital age was restricted, we can hope to build a new story of our past, and thereby gain a new understanding of who we are today.

First Principal’s Webinar Tuesday October 26th at 4:00PM!

October 21st, 2010 7 comments

Is your school library a quiet storage facility for books gathering dust or a vibrant hub of academic learning characterized by collaboration, research, and problem solving? Principals and Librarians are a powerful team for moving a school toward effective integration of learning and technology!

Library media specialists should be the hub for the wheel that connects 21st century information technology with all the content areas in Maine’s schools. Principals, as the educational leaders in schools, make key decisions that can support, enable, and sustain the core supporting role of the school library program.

Principals and librarians are invited to join in the conversation with our panel of librarians and principals including Teri Caouette from MLTI, Nancy Grant from Penquis Valley High School, Pam Goucher from Freeport Middle School, and Eileen Broderick tech integrator and library media specialist from Rumford Elementary School.

To sign up for the free webinar please select Webcasts at the top of this page.

Webinar Recap: Evaluating Resources and Publishing Student Work

June 19th, 2010 No comments

Students are often cast on to a desert island of research and asked to find the resources they need to help them find their way back to civilization. They may have received little or no instruction in how to tell if a resource is reliable, which can often make the process of research a bewildering and sometimes frustrating endeavor. As teachers, we need to help our students in evaluating resources, make them aware of what constitutes a reliable source of information, and alert them to the pitfalls.

In Thursday’s webinar, I put forward four questions we can have students ask themselves when they begin to evaluate a web resource:
“Why was this site created?”
“Who’s paying for this?”
“Why does the site look like this?”
and “Can the same information be found elsewhere?”

These questions begin to establish the motivation of the site’s creators, what message they are trying to convey, and the all important piece that student’s often struggle with: can the information be verified?

We discussed some pointers that students can use to gauge the reliability of a resource, which included authority, bias, design, transparency and currency. The feelings of the participants in the webinar was that there is no one pointer toward reliability, especially not domain names, which are often regarded as a guarantee of trust.

Students can use citation generators to help them establish the credibility of a resource. By filling in reference, students have to be able to identify certain information from a site that helps them critique it more thoroughly. Two citation generators available online: Easybib and Son of Citation Machine.

Using a social bookmarking site can give  a student a quick glimpse at how many people have at least looked at a site, and why that may be useful site to peruse. Delicious and Diigo are two such social bookmarking sites.

Some further website evaluation tools to take a peek at:

USM Library Website Evaluation Checklist

C-TEC Website Evaluation Form
Kathy Schrock’s ABCs of Website Evaluation (dated, but still a great guide)

In the webinar we also discussed the publishing of student work, really the end result of conducting and organizing research for a student. There are many benefits for publishing to the student, such as raising confidence in writing for an audience and the ability to receive feedback from someone other than a teacher. Many of these points have been covered in previous webinars by my colleague’s Barbara Greenstone and Phil Brookhouse: please check out their work if you haven’t yet done so.

There are many paces in which students can get their work into a wider audience:
Using blogs is an interesting method of creating an ongoing discussion and feedback. One place that caters to student blogs is Edublogs.
A wiki can be created so that only members can critique a piece of work, which can be of benefit when considering the age and maturity of a student. Wikispaces works well in this aspect.
There are dedicated sites to publishing student work, many can be found with a websearch Teen Ink is one such space.
Student wok can also be published in non-traditional, text-based format. Google Earth Community is a space for publishing files created in Google Earth, and can be a fun format for students to focus their research findings. Podcasts can be created and published on Podbean, for the delight of the world. And our old friend YouTube is a reliable space to host video.

I’m also making an impassioned plea not to do away with the school magazine! Many schools have a goal to be paperless, however I believe this is one bit of paper we should keep out of the trash. The school magazine can hold many pieces of student work, is easily distributed amongst peers and has a sentimental value that can last many years. I myself still have copies of my old school magazine, and do not plan on getting rid of them. With the publishing and productivity tools available on the MLTI devices, professional and attractive looking magazines are straightforward and achievable.

Be sure to watch a recording of the webinar – click on the tab marked ‘Webcasts’ above, then ‘Archives’, and locate the June 17th 2010 recording.