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MLTI Professional Development Fall 2012

September 26th, 2012 1 comment

We’re coming to a school near you very soon! This year, the MLTI Professional Development team is going to be in every region of the state, delivering high quality workshops aimed at specific content areas for educators. We will be delivering a series of one-day, hands-on sessions, both in the fall and the spring. We would like to see as many teachers, librarians and administrators as we can attend these sessions, so please spread the word and we’ll see you on the road!

The Fall PD Session descriptors are listed below. For further details on the sessions, their dates and locations, and registration information, click on the session title. For further MLTI Professional Development information, please go to this page on maine.gov.

The Art of Technology in Mathematics

Unlock mathematical conceptual understanding through discovery using technology. Come explore technology options at your fingertips as we seamlessly integrate the MLTI with the new Common Core State Standards. This hands-on workshop will utilize resources to add to your toolkit for teaching and learning. Templates and applets will be provided as we look at ways to increase student conceptual understanding using Geogebra, Grapher, Numbers, and other tools on the MLTI image.

Supporting Students with Special Needs Using MLTI and Universal Design for Learning

This hands-on workshop will begin by exploring accessibility options and adjusting preference settings on the MLTI device to meet the needs of the learner. Participants will also learn to create lessons that target Response to Intervention and incorporate different learning styles to increase universal access for classroom activities. We’ll also examine exciting ways to “provide multiple means of engagement” for students through creating social stories and learning how to socially navigate the world around them. Participants will explore ways to apply these skills to creating Digital Portfolios. Students will ultimately be able to showcase projects that target their Individualized Education Plan benchmarks and goals as well as self-assess their work.

Shift Happens! Common Core, ELA and Digital Literacy
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) identifies 6 shifts in ELA/Literacy, including text complexity, writing from sources and academic vocabulary. This session will explore instructional practices and approaches using digital tools that address the shifts, and provide strategies for implementing the Common Core in the English classroom and across disciplines.

Leveraging Technology with Science Practices

In anticipation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), many educators in Maine are already integrating some of the  8 Science and Engineering Practices into current instruction. Here’s a chance to look more deeply at those Practices from the Framework for K-12 Science Education that inform the NGSS. We will explore MLTI science applications for a hands-on investigation of their alignment to the Maine Learning Results and Practices of the Framework, and discover more ways that technology can enhance learning.

The Art Studio in your MLTI MacBook

Join MLTI to discover the art studio in your MLTI MacBook. Learn new ways to create art, explore tools to design digital portfolios, gain understanding in managing your digital art classroom and grow your research process knowledge. This day will be filled with valuable information for the art teacher.

Digital Citizenship in a Changing World

Students are living in a world of 24/7 access to technology that enables learning and communication in a way that was not possible even a few years ago. This workshop will help you to learn about the digital landscape our students are now living in, and how educators can help students think critically and make responsible choices to improve achievement. We will be exploring some of the free K-12 resources available through Common Sense Media and how to implement them in your classrooms and schools.
Integrating Technology into the World Language Classroom
Technology has produced new communication opportunities, created new ways to participate in culture, and redefined what we call community. This session will focus on integrating MLTI tools into the World Language learners’ experience. We will explore ways to use technology to immerse learners in authentic language and cultural experiences while keeping an eye on assessment and other realities like the Common Core and the Maine Learning Results.
Where’s the Evidence? Digital Tools, Source Material and the Social Studies Classroom

As emerging social scientists, students must have the skills to locate, interpret and use primary and secondary sources in their work. The wealth of source material online, and the digital tools to utilize these resources, present humanities teachers with enormous opportunities to develop these skills in their classes. This workshop will provide educators with strategies for using source material with students: how to find the resources, incorporate source material in student writing, and having students present their interpretations to the world.

 

May 17 Webinar – From Micro to Macro: 21st Century Economics Education

May 14th, 2012 No comments

Economics is a subject that is generally given the lightest touch as part of a social studies curriculum, and yet an understanding of economic concepts can have some of the longest standing results in student’s lives beyond school. By incorporating a broader study of economics into curriculum beyond a social studies classroom, students will be able to create and stick to a personal budget, follow and predict fluctuations in stock and land prices, develop business plans that are sustainable and understand how economic practices influence international development. Economics is an important part of every student’s education, and every teacher can play a part in developing economic understanding.

This webinar will look at tools on the MLTI image and online that can support the teaching of economics. From personal finance to global economic indicators, there are many ways in which digital tools can build an understanding of concepts such as supply and demand, input and output and economic development. While this is not intended to be a comprehensive view of an economics curriculum, it will point the way to developing an engaging method of incorporating the subject into schoolwide teaching and learning.

To join the webinar, click on the Webcasts tab above and follow the links to register.

Image by images_of_money on Flickr. Used under a CC BY 2.0 license.

April 5 Webinar: Hot Points – Current Events and Digital Tools

April 1st, 2012 No comments

Current events teaching has never been juicier. Up to the second information on events from all points of the four winds can be easily gathered, disseminated and pored over using digital tools. Videos from within the Occupy Wall Street camp, tweets from observers and players in the Arab Spring uprising and the ability to communicate with anyone at the center of a news story via iChat means that students now have a more immediate connection to events than most journalists had fifteen years ago. And with traditional news sources sometimes struggling to compete with the constant flow of information, our students have never been in a better position to show their flair as budding journalists.

This webinar demonstrated how students can access information and turn it into a news story – making sense of multiple sources, applying a clear vision and creating news stories of their own. We discussed some of the drawbacks to the mass of unfiltered information, and how we can help our students become objective reporters and informed opinion makers.

Here are the links I shared in the webinar:

Newsmap: a visual representation of the Google News aggregator

Google News: Try customising the page using the Preference sliders

Newsvine: user voted news stories – a good place to take the temperature of the news

Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages: over 900 front pages from the world’s newspapers, update daily.

MARVEL: ProQuest News
database is a fantastic resource for searching through 1400+ publications from around the world, with many publication’s articles going back at least a decade.

In addition, we looked at YouTube’s capabilities for up to the minute footage of events, and iTunes Store’s News and Politics Podcasts. Google Earth can provide background on the areas where events are taking place, and the World Data Analyst on MARVEL can help with statistics on each country.

Image by Giladlotan on Flickr. Used with a Creative Commons License CC BY-NC 2.0

March 1 Webinar: Maps With Everything

February 27th, 2012 No comments

When students are asked to use maps, it will mostly be to find out where places are. This kind of thinking merely skims the surface of how maps can be used and created. Maps can be visual representations of any information that has a place ie. can be given location coordinates. Therefore, maps can be used in all content areas, in many different contexts. Using digital tools, including Google Earth, My World GIS and online mapping tools, students can create and use maps that are useful to them in all of their work in school and deepen their understanding of all subjects.

This webinar will look at using digital maps effectively in many different content areas. Join the webinar to share ideas of where maps can fit into your teaching, discover where to find resources to help students create powerful geographic representations and play with mapping tools to increase your understanding of an often underutilized strategy for learning.

During this webinar, I will be looking at ArcGIS Online Explorer, which requires the use of the Silverlight Plugin. If you’d like to play along with this tool, please make sure your MLTI device has the Plugin installed (this will require your device’s administrative password). If in any doubt, please contact your building’s technology supervisor.

Please click on the Webcasts tab to register. We have upgraded to a new registration system, allowing you to register directly in Adobe Connect, making the whole webinar process smoother and easier! If you have any questions, please contact Juanita Dickson. Click on the time you wish to participate in and you will be directed to an online registration form. Please type your email address carefully as all information will be sent to that address. After registering you will receive a confirmation email with a log in link – please use that link to log into the webinar prior to the start time.

Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mithril/2971301070/

January 19th Webinar – Social Media and Social Studies

January 15th, 2012 No comments

Social Studies involves itself with human communication and events. It seems that social media was developed to enhance and encourage the interactions of people. Therefore, what is the interplay of these two realms? This webinar will seek to discover the links between our students in their social studies and their social media. How can Twitter help our students understand the thoughts of people from long ago? What part can Facebook play in encouraging young people to take a participatory role in civic life? And can wikis be used to build a better understanding of our world? Join the webinar at 3.15 or 7.15, be prepared to connect with others and find out how a more connected world can mean a deeper, more enlightened social studies student.

As preparation for this webinar, it may be of benefit to you if you have a Twitter, Facebook and Flickr account, as well as become a member of wikispaces. All are free and easy to sign up, just follow the links and bookmark the pages for the webinar. These are not essential for participation, however they may enhance and extend the opportunities on offer.

Please click on the Webcasts tab to register. We have upgraded to a new registration system, allowing you to register directly in Adobe Connect, making the whole webinar process smoother and easier! If you have any questions, please contact Juanita Dickson. Click on the time you wish to participate in and you will be directed to an online registration form.  Please type your email address carefully as all information will be sent to that address. After registering you will receive a confirmation email with a log in link – please use that link to log into the webinar prior to the start time.

 

image by trois tetes on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons BY-NC2.0 License

Notes from the October 28th Webinar: Accessing the Past

November 1st, 2010 No comments

The digitizing of primary source material is becoming an important step forward in the teaching and learning of history. The ability of students to access and use high quality images of primary sources that once were confined to archives, museums, libraries and historical society’s shelves means that new learning and understanding of the past is feasible at an unprecedented level. In addition, the tools available to students to create their own digital copies of primary sources adds a dimension of ownership to the creation of history that can only be imagined at this point. However, as educators, we must ensure that this process and action is ongoing, rigorous and meaningful.

We should be encouraging our students to explore and add to current archives of material available to them. Some of the online collections that were examined in the webinar included the Maine State Archives Civil War Sesquicentennial Collection, the Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress Flickr Collection of historic images. These three collections give a varied picture of how primary source materials are being presented to the public, and really only hint at the kinds of material available. To deepen this examination, students could be directed to search YouTube for primary source video, such as news broadcasts and amateur footage of events, and the Internet Archive for audio recordings.

The creation of digital copies of primary source material using student laptops is surprisingly simple, with the addition of a scanner or a digital camera that can create high resolution images. Scanners that can create images of 800 pixels per inch are now very affordable for most department budgets, and can be used by many to create an impressive library of digital images of documents, photographic prints and other material on a page, such as maps, plans and newspaper articles.
On the MLTI laptops, the application Image Capture makes the process getting a scanner to work very easy. For most scanners, it is a straightforward ‘plug and play’, and the ability to work with the images pre-scan is taken care of right in the application. Adjusting resolution, size of the image created, naming and location the image will be placed on the machine is now a matter of a few clicks.

Scanning guidelines for archival material can be found on the Maine Memory Network site.

Once a digital copy has been created, it is important to name the material correctly. This can be for the purposes of retrieval if the copies are added to a database, for both the creator and another user. If standard naming conventions are followed, it will make it more useful when sharing the material for anyone to locate and understand the material. The Maine State Archives have provided a naming convention for files containing digital copies, and can be found here.

Using digital tools to create meaning and understanding from primary source materials can occur in many ways. Using Comic Life to ‘unpack’ an image is a great entry point for many students: the whole image of the material can be placed in the center of a page, and cutaway focus images of the detail can then be added to the page, with text bubbles providing commentary on the detail. iMovie can be used to generate a Ken Burns style documentary (the default setting for still images in iMovie is the Ken Burns effect). Using Google Earth to locate the source material’s origin or current archive, through adding placemarks to the map, is a powerful way to build relationships to the material through geography. Building online collections, through blogs and wikis, and also through Flickr sets, provides the opportunity for the wider world to comment on the material, thus leading to new perspectives and new understanding around documents that were perhaps previously only available to a few.

The connections to the past that can be created through students using primary source material are important for the future of history and historical learning. By creating and gaining access to primary source material that before the arrival of the digital age was restricted, we can hope to build a new story of our past, and thereby gain a new understanding of who we are today.

October 28 Webinar: Accessing the Past – Using Primary Sources Digitally

October 22nd, 2010 No comments

Powerful connections and understandings can be made when a student is able to use primary source material in their work. Their interpretation of documents, letters, photographs, films, contemporary reports and objects creates new learning and meaning, by placing the world of yesterday in the framework of our world today.

For too long, access to primary source material has been limited to museums, archives, historical societies as well as attics and basements. Now, with a growing movement to make digital copies of this material available online, access to primary source material is unprecedented for the student researcher. This access obviously brings great benefits, but also challenges: finding the material, storing the copies, and creating high quality digital copies that are accessible to all.

This webinar will discuss and demonstrate how students can create digital copies of primary source material available in their local area, and make the copies available to online users. We will talk about standards for digital copies of material, and work with tools that can be used in this process. In addition, we will look at online collections that are available for use, and discuss ways in which students can use the material found in collections.There will also be a chance to share your own experiences of using primary source material, both with students and from your own work.

This webinar is a precursor to the Maine Council for Social Studies conference on Friday, November 12. For more details on this conference, please visit http://www.memun.org/mcss/

This session will be delivered on Thursday, October 28, at 3:15 PM and again at 7:15 PM. For information and to register, please choose the WebCasts tab at the top of this page.

Thanks to Jim Moulton for the image, showing a letter from Charles Potter from Bowdoin, ME, dated Aug 14, 1835.