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MLTI Professional Development Fall 2012

September 26th, 2012 1 comment

We’re coming to a school near you very soon! This year, the MLTI Professional Development team is going to be in every region of the state, delivering high quality workshops aimed at specific content areas for educators. We will be delivering a series of one-day, hands-on sessions, both in the fall and the spring. We would like to see as many teachers, librarians and administrators as we can attend these sessions, so please spread the word and we’ll see you on the road!

The Fall PD Session descriptors are listed below. For further details on the sessions, their dates and locations, and registration information, click on the session title. For further MLTI Professional Development information, please go to this page on maine.gov.

The Art of Technology in Mathematics

Unlock mathematical conceptual understanding through discovery using technology. Come explore technology options at your fingertips as we seamlessly integrate the MLTI with the new Common Core State Standards. This hands-on workshop will utilize resources to add to your toolkit for teaching and learning. Templates and applets will be provided as we look at ways to increase student conceptual understanding using Geogebra, Grapher, Numbers, and other tools on the MLTI image.

Supporting Students with Special Needs Using MLTI and Universal Design for Learning

This hands-on workshop will begin by exploring accessibility options and adjusting preference settings on the MLTI device to meet the needs of the learner. Participants will also learn to create lessons that target Response to Intervention and incorporate different learning styles to increase universal access for classroom activities. We’ll also examine exciting ways to “provide multiple means of engagement” for students through creating social stories and learning how to socially navigate the world around them. Participants will explore ways to apply these skills to creating Digital Portfolios. Students will ultimately be able to showcase projects that target their Individualized Education Plan benchmarks and goals as well as self-assess their work.

Shift Happens! Common Core, ELA and Digital Literacy
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) identifies 6 shifts in ELA/Literacy, including text complexity, writing from sources and academic vocabulary. This session will explore instructional practices and approaches using digital tools that address the shifts, and provide strategies for implementing the Common Core in the English classroom and across disciplines.

Leveraging Technology with Science Practices

In anticipation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), many educators in Maine are already integrating some of the  8 Science and Engineering Practices into current instruction. Here’s a chance to look more deeply at those Practices from the Framework for K-12 Science Education that inform the NGSS. We will explore MLTI science applications for a hands-on investigation of their alignment to the Maine Learning Results and Practices of the Framework, and discover more ways that technology can enhance learning.

The Art Studio in your MLTI MacBook

Join MLTI to discover the art studio in your MLTI MacBook. Learn new ways to create art, explore tools to design digital portfolios, gain understanding in managing your digital art classroom and grow your research process knowledge. This day will be filled with valuable information for the art teacher.

Digital Citizenship in a Changing World

Students are living in a world of 24/7 access to technology that enables learning and communication in a way that was not possible even a few years ago. This workshop will help you to learn about the digital landscape our students are now living in, and how educators can help students think critically and make responsible choices to improve achievement. We will be exploring some of the free K-12 resources available through Common Sense Media and how to implement them in your classrooms and schools.
Integrating Technology into the World Language Classroom
Technology has produced new communication opportunities, created new ways to participate in culture, and redefined what we call community. This session will focus on integrating MLTI tools into the World Language learners’ experience. We will explore ways to use technology to immerse learners in authentic language and cultural experiences while keeping an eye on assessment and other realities like the Common Core and the Maine Learning Results.
Where’s the Evidence? Digital Tools, Source Material and the Social Studies Classroom

As emerging social scientists, students must have the skills to locate, interpret and use primary and secondary sources in their work. The wealth of source material online, and the digital tools to utilize these resources, present humanities teachers with enormous opportunities to develop these skills in their classes. This workshop will provide educators with strategies for using source material with students: how to find the resources, incorporate source material in student writing, and having students present their interpretations to the world.

 

Notes from the October 28th Webinar: Accessing the Past

November 1st, 2010 No comments

The digitizing of primary source material is becoming an important step forward in the teaching and learning of history. The ability of students to access and use high quality images of primary sources that once were confined to archives, museums, libraries and historical society’s shelves means that new learning and understanding of the past is feasible at an unprecedented level. In addition, the tools available to students to create their own digital copies of primary sources adds a dimension of ownership to the creation of history that can only be imagined at this point. However, as educators, we must ensure that this process and action is ongoing, rigorous and meaningful.

We should be encouraging our students to explore and add to current archives of material available to them. Some of the online collections that were examined in the webinar included the Maine State Archives Civil War Sesquicentennial Collection, the Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress Flickr Collection of historic images. These three collections give a varied picture of how primary source materials are being presented to the public, and really only hint at the kinds of material available. To deepen this examination, students could be directed to search YouTube for primary source video, such as news broadcasts and amateur footage of events, and the Internet Archive for audio recordings.

The creation of digital copies of primary source material using student laptops is surprisingly simple, with the addition of a scanner or a digital camera that can create high resolution images. Scanners that can create images of 800 pixels per inch are now very affordable for most department budgets, and can be used by many to create an impressive library of digital images of documents, photographic prints and other material on a page, such as maps, plans and newspaper articles.
On the MLTI laptops, the application Image Capture makes the process getting a scanner to work very easy. For most scanners, it is a straightforward ‘plug and play’, and the ability to work with the images pre-scan is taken care of right in the application. Adjusting resolution, size of the image created, naming and location the image will be placed on the machine is now a matter of a few clicks.

Scanning guidelines for archival material can be found on the Maine Memory Network site.

Once a digital copy has been created, it is important to name the material correctly. This can be for the purposes of retrieval if the copies are added to a database, for both the creator and another user. If standard naming conventions are followed, it will make it more useful when sharing the material for anyone to locate and understand the material. The Maine State Archives have provided a naming convention for files containing digital copies, and can be found here.

Using digital tools to create meaning and understanding from primary source materials can occur in many ways. Using Comic Life to ‘unpack’ an image is a great entry point for many students: the whole image of the material can be placed in the center of a page, and cutaway focus images of the detail can then be added to the page, with text bubbles providing commentary on the detail. iMovie can be used to generate a Ken Burns style documentary (the default setting for still images in iMovie is the Ken Burns effect). Using Google Earth to locate the source material’s origin or current archive, through adding placemarks to the map, is a powerful way to build relationships to the material through geography. Building online collections, through blogs and wikis, and also through Flickr sets, provides the opportunity for the wider world to comment on the material, thus leading to new perspectives and new understanding around documents that were perhaps previously only available to a few.

The connections to the past that can be created through students using primary source material are important for the future of history and historical learning. By creating and gaining access to primary source material that before the arrival of the digital age was restricted, we can hope to build a new story of our past, and thereby gain a new understanding of who we are today.