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Learning Styles and the MLTI Device Merge

Are you developing lessons that include Multiple Intelligences? I am always amazed at the different ways teachers create rich, learning experiences using applications on their MLTI device which incorporate the different learning styles.

Research has long shown that teaching to a student’s learning style increases their achievement (Charkins, O’Tolle, & Wetzel, 1985) and the traditional chalk and talk teaching methodology doesn’t take into account the different learning styles (Dunn, 2000), When you put these longstanding findings together, it makes sense to teachers using tools that incorporate the different learning styles, would improve their students’ learning outcomes. One easy way to enhance your lessons is to use your MLTI device which has several applications that target more than one learning style. This brief post will list some of the MLTI applications and the different learning styles they account for.

The learning styles are based upon Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory (1983) with the first seven being bodily-kinesthetic (movement), spatial (visual), linguistic (verbal), intrapersonal (self-awareness), interpersonal (group), musical, and logical-mathematical (numbers). Naturalistic and existential are the two latecomers to makeup the nine identified intelligences (Gardner, 1999). Table one below outlines the different learning styles that can be targeted using applications on the MLTI device.

 

Table 1: Multiple Intelligences and Applications on the MLTI Device Merge
Application Multiple Intelligence
Acorn Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Linguistic, Spatial
Adobe Digital Editions Preview Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Spatial
Bento Logical-Mathematical, Naturalistic, Spatial
Comic Life Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
DataStudio Logical-Mathematical, Spatial
GarageBand (iLife) Bodily-Kinesthetic, Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Linguistic, Musical, Spatial
GeoGebra Logical-Mathematical, Spatial
Grapher Logical-Mathematical, Spatial
iChat Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
iMovie (iLife) Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
iPhoto (iLife) Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
iTunes (iLife) Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
KeyNote (iWork) Bodily-Kinesthetic, Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Linguistic, Musical, Spatial
Maine Explorer Existential, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Naturalistic, Spatial
Marvel Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Spatial
MindNode Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Naturalistic, Spatial
NoteShare Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
Numbers (iWork) Logical-Mathematical, Spatial
OmniGraffle Professional Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Naturalistic, Spatial
Pages (iWork) Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Linguistic, Spatial
PhotoBooth Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Musical, Spatial
ProfCast Bodily-Kinesthetic, Existential, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
QuickTime Player Bodily-Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Musical, Spatial
Scratch Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Spatial
SketchUp Interpersonal, Spatial
TextEdit Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Spatial
WolfQuest Bodily-Kinesthetic, Existential, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Spatial
WriteRoom Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Spatial

The table above helps to spatially organize the applications and the different learning styles that they can target. Depending on your creativity, you can find ways to include all the Multiple Intelligences with the MLTI applications.

Using the different MLTI tools provides students a way to access the content through different learning styles and to present their findings using Multiple Intelligences. The idea is to enhance teaching methodologies and student engagement by using the great applications that are available on your MLTI device. You can visit the MLTI Minute site to learn how to use the applications listed above with their one minute tutorials. Enjoy the MLTI Minutes at: http://minute.maine121.org/episode-list-2/

How do you use the different applications on your MLTI device to connect with Multiple Intelligences?

References:

Charkins, R. J., O’Toole, D. M. and Wetzel, J. N. (1985) ‘Linking teacher and student learning styles with student achievement and attitudes’, Journal of Economic Education, vol. 16, Spring, pp. 111-20.

Dunn, R. (2000). Capitalizing on College Students’ Learning Styles: Theory, Practice, and Research. In Dunn, R. and R. Griggs, R. (Eds.), Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education, (p 3-18). Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of Mind. The theory of multiple intelligences. New York, NY. Basic Books. Twentieth Anniversary Edition with new introduction. New York, NY. Basic Books, 2004.

Gardner, H. (1999). Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligence for the 21st Century. New York, NY. Basic Books.

Lindsey Farnham, MLTI Integration Mentor

 

 

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  1. Ben Braasch
    November 25th, 2012 at 15:50 | #1

    I’m currently taking an online G/T course with MEC. I am becoming more and more aware of this topic ( learning styles) in my the design of G/T Lang Arts/Reading ( 6th-8th). Is there any future workshops offered or opportunities for me to become connected with your work?
    BB

    • Lfarnham
      December 6th, 2012 at 17:46 | #2

      Hi Ben,
      MLTI will be posting Spring sessions for Special Education shortly. I hope you signup.
      Lindsey, MLTI Integration Mentor

    • Lfarnham
      January 4th, 2013 at 12:16 | #3

      Hi Ben,
      The dates are posted. Supporting Students with Special Needs Using MLTI and Universal Design for Learning
      This hands-on workshop will begin by exploring accessibility options and adjusting preference settings on the MLTI device to meet the needs of the learner. Participants will also learn to create lessons that target Response to Intervention and incorporate different learning styles to increase universal access for classroom activities. We’ll also examine exciting ways to “provide multiple means of engagement” for students through creating social stories and learning how to socially navigate the world around them. Participants will explore ways to apply these skills to creating Digital Portfolios. Students will ultimately be able to showcase projects that target their Individualized Education Plan benchmarks and goals as well as self-assess their work.
      This is a repeat of the Fall 2012 session but we encourage you to join us again to review and spend more time on applications on your own.
      • January 29, 2013: Madawaska Middle/High School
      • January 31, 2013: Cumberland TBD
      • February 7, 2013: Eric L Knowlton School
      • February 13, 2013: Spruce Mountain Middle School
      • February 27, 2013: Midcoast TBD
      • March 6, 2013: Woodland Jr Sr High School
      • March 11, 2013: Cumberland TBD
      • March 14, 2013: Katahdin MS/HS
      • March 20, 2013: Washington Academy

  2. SDHS English
    June 13th, 2013 at 08:10 | #4

    Keith Dunson
    There is no scientific evidence in support of learning styles of any kind. Multiple Intelligences by Gardiner has never been subjected to construct validity studies. He admits there is no science behind MI. Current neurological studies on how humans learn largely refute the notion of learning styles. The studies indicating efficacy are flawed. My professional opinion is that it is unethical to make educational decisions based upon approaches that have no scientific validity/no established construct validity. MI limits a child’s self-perception – not a good thing.
    Just for starters, see: Willingham The American Educator; the Pennington Blog; The Myth of Learning Styles – neuroscience – ThInk. There are many more sites on this.

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